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The Unwanted Auschwitz

A reader may regard the title of the article as a paradox or provocation. Especially from the perspective of 70 years that have passed since the end of World War II. Considering the numerous debates emphasising the documentary and educational importance of the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial, the numerous conservatory activities to preserve the postcamp relics - the unwanted Auschwitz is something incomprehensible. It is a superficial feeling, though, as the real space of Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum is merely a small part of what Auschwitz in fact was.

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Traces of the Holocaust in my Artistic Practice

The word ‘trace’ has perpetually haunted me throughout most of my adult and scholarly life. As an artist, I recreate rooms and spaces dedicated to the past, collecting wartime artefacts and antiques that I cannot stop myself from obtaining and keeping, even though the majority of the time it is only me that sees or feels them. It is an obsession, the notion that each object leads to another world. Another life, a personal identity, a story.

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'It Is Sweet to Die for the Fatherland…' - the Story of Bernard Świerczyna

“But you who knew me will write in your reports
That I spent my younger years for my country,
And as long as the ship battled, I sat at mast,
And when it sank, I went down with it...”

'My Testament' by J. Słowacki

On July 18, 1940 a twenty-six-year-old clerk and law student lost his freedom and identity. He was no longer Bernard Świerczyna but number 1393. The only things which could not be changed or killed by the Nazi regime were his patriotism and love for Poland…

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MA in Holocaust Studies Student featured in National Holocaust Memorial Event in London 2016

Today’s blog post is written by our student Hannah Wilson (Cohort II). Wilson’s participation in our ‘Visual Culture and the Holocaust’ course inspired the creation of a special piece that was featured at the National Holocaust Memorial event in London. Through her work with the Holocaust Educational Trust, and her experience from our program, Wilson was selected as one of 12 entries to be featured at this event. Here’s what she has to say about the experience:

As I began my Masters degree in Holocaust Studies at the University of Haifa, I was thrilled to be offered a range of interdisciplinary modules, including ‘Visual Culture and the Holocaust’. As an arts graduate, my work and research has primarily focused around artists who produced work during and after the Holocaust, and how these pieces are represented in institutional settings. The course also introduced me to debates and issues surrounding the future of Holocaust education. Coincidentally, when I returned to the UK from Israel to finish writing up my thesis, I began working in a secondary school as a Learning Support Assistant.

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