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Lager VIII: Karpfenteich

Camp for: originally British POW’s, then German civilian workers
Camp population: 1,350 at its peak (figure includes British POW’s and German workers)
Camp Lagerführer: Gerhard Ritter

Karpfenteich, Lager VIII in the IG Farben classification was so called due to its proximity with the large ponds that resided on its southern and western borders. The camp was flanked by Teichgrund to its north west and Lager IX (unnamed) to its east. The fields directly to its north and to the east of Teichgrund still bear the scars of Allied bombing from 1944 that missed the camp by sheer yards.

The camp comprised of 15 barracks for prisoners, with the majority originally reserved for British POW’s before they were moved to Lager VI Pulverturm in the spring of 1944. Only then did the entire camps surroundings fall under the administration of IG Farben, who previously shared it with the Lamsdorf Stalag VIII sub-camp of E715. 

At first, the German civilian population was only 1/10 of the British POW’s who resided in the largest part of the camp, fenced off from each other. As the British POW population decreased, the German civilian numbers climbed.

According to testimonies related to this camp, workers were sent here from Oświęcim as well as Germany. The Arbeitsamt (employment office in Oświęcim) handed out job details to the Poles for this camp, just as they did for other camps such as Leonhard Haag or Teichgrund for example.

As of 2016, the camp has not been commemorated.

 

Prisoner Testimonies of Karpfenteich

Read the testimony of Kazimiera Krzak (nee Nowak)

 

Existing Camp Relics

The field the camp inhabited is now completely empty. Seemingly no relics exist here, although the Auschwitz Study Group has yet to explore the possibilities of materials that may have been recycled in the close area.

Map showing the barracks and camp buildings of Karpfenteich
Map showing the barracks and camp buildings of Karpfenteich
Map designed by Michael Challoner ©

 

The field where the camp existed, now completely empty
           
The northern side of the camp with Teichgrund to the North west
           
The ponds to the south of Karpfenteich that lent its name to the camp
            Image 1
The field where the camp existed, now completely empty
Photo by Michael Challoner ©

Image 2
The northern side of the camp with Teichgrund to the North west of
the image. The chimneys that now occupy the former site of
IG Farben can be made out in the background
Photo by Michael Challoner ©

Image 3
The ponds to the south of Karpfenteich that lent its name to the camp
Photo by Michael Challoner ©

 

Sources

Information about sources we used while researching the werk kamp you can find here.